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Heatstroke in Dogs

Every summer poses great danger to your pet. The heat is a huge danger to your pet. This can be a simple stop when you leave your pet in the car. People can leave their pet in the car for just a few minutes but it may be enough to kill your dog. Heatstroke is a real danger and must be watched out for.

Causal Factors of Heatstroke

Dogs can not cool themselves off like humans. Humans sweat and cool their bodies. Your dogs skin can not release sweat to cool off. They are limited to panting when they are trying to cool themselves. You must help your dog control its temperature because they can not.

Heat prostration or heat exhaustion can occur when the temp of your dog rises above 106 degrees Fahrenheit. One degree more can cause your dog to expire. This can happen in an instant and throw your dog into organ failure and your dog can die within 20 minutes.

Heatstroke can result from a number of things. All have to do with overheating your dog and placing too much stress on his cooling mechanism. Common causes are the following

• Playing hard on hot and humid days

• Working too hard on hot and humid days

• Leaving your dog confined in a hot car without fresh air

• Leaving your dog in a hot house or a kennel without shade.

• Leaving your dog in a crate outside when the temperatures are high

Symptoms of Heatstroke

The symptoms of heat stroke can happen quickly. They quickly escalate until your dog collapses. The following are some symptoms of heat stroke.

• Constant panting

• If you are running or out on a walk, the animal will begin to lag behind.

• The heart is beating rapidly.

• The dog is having trouble breathing.

• The dog becomes weak. The dog is unsteady on his her feet.

• The gums are pale.

• The animal may be extremely thirsty or have no thirst at all.

• There may be excessive salivation.

• There is a decrease in mental awareness and acuity.

• The urine may be concentrated becoming a dark yellow in appearance.

• Collapse. If your dog collapses from heatstroke the onset is well-advanced.

Treatment

The best thing to do is get the dog to the vet right away. Your dog will need IV fluids. If you can not make it to the vet you have to cool your dog down right away. You can put the hose on the dog and spray it with cool water. Do not use cold water because this can be a shock to your dogs exerted system.

Susceptibility

Some breeds are more prone to heat stroke and heat problems. This includes dogs with short noses like pugs, boxers, and bulldogs. Dogs with heavier coats have trouble staying cool as well. Overweight dogs are at risk as well.

You should never have to encounter heat stroke. It is easily preventable and will be your fault if it happens. Never leave your dog in the car with the windows up. Don’t leave your dog outside in hot weather. Provide your dog with shade and plenty of water.

Content written by Jess Carter of Oh My Dog Supplies, check out our complete collection of dog seat covers online.

 

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