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The German Shepherd Breed

Alsatian is just another name used for the common term German Shepherd. This dog breed was intended to guard the herding sheep against any wolf or bear attacks. "Captain Max" von Stephanitz is the person responsible for breeding this type of dog back in the 1899s. He was the proud owner of the first German Shepherd called Horand von Grafrath from which all other German Shepherds originated.

Nowadays the Shepherd has become a formidable dog with excellent obedience and tracking skills obtained after some serious years of selective breeding. The breed is meant for environments which require a lot of activity. The British have become aware of the existence of this dog during the 20th century when the German forces have employed the services of this dog on the front lines of the initial World War. The breed serves as an excellent guide for blind people as well as for search and rescue and police work. They are great guards and may also be used in therapy and by the military.

The dog isn't entirely bred for work considering he is a trustworthy companion and loves and protects its family members and other pets which you may possess in your home. It has no problems adapting to living in the company of people or being around other animals. The breed will have to be trained to socialize from birth to prevent the dog from becoming extremely aggressive over the course of the years when reaching adulthood. The Shepherd is a fine breed with distinct features which will prove to be a suitable choice for any owner.

Various organizations and countries have had an active role to play in the fine standard of his breed. The dog itself is quite large and weighs from 75 towards 110 lbs. on certain occasions reaching 150 lbs. A male German shepherd will grow to reach around 24 even 26 inches in height while the females of the breed will reach 22 inches sometimes 24. The German shepherd has a double layer of coating one an under coat and another outer coat.

This particular breed will be easily recognized due to its emphasized features like his huge head, his straight ears and the muzzle which is shaped as a wedge. The legs are very athletic and the breed presents a unique gait.

The behavior of an adult is determined by the time spent socializing as a young pup. The genes that this breed has to offer are a main cause for the behavior of adult German Shepherds. The genes are a high factor in the type of personality a dog will develop as well as in the level of exercise he may be able to endure. The genes will not be worth much if there hasn't been any time invested in helping a dog from this breed socialize as a young puppy. The breed is an excellent example of co-existing together with the family members as well as an aggressive example when it comes to defending his owner against potential dangers.

The most often sickness that the dogs of this breed may encounter is hip and elbow dysplasia. The dog will need to be exercised so that this disease will not affect him so he may remain in working and healthy condition throughout his life. The dog breed is also inclined to suffer from bloat, or certain skin allergies, in some cases even from the von Willebrand's disease. They may also be affected from canine degenerative myelopathy.

The breed is specialized in search and rescue because it has an excellent olfactory sense being able to detect corpses from miles away. They can smell explosives and detect narcotics so they are suitable for police work as well. A dog from the German shepherd breed will live between 10 and 12 years.

Content written by Lori Dawson of www.ohmydogsupplies.com, look for current specials on dog food storage online.

 

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